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January 2019

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It’s a New Year and with that comes all sorts of resolutions. Some promise to spend less money while others vow to hit the gym and lose weight. Those that choose the later are probably following a healthy diet, however, as healthy as some weight loss programs may seem; they are not good for your teeth and gums. According to Dr. Mike Morris, even some of the most popular diets affect your teeth and gums. The Low Fat Diet and Teeth and Gums Diets that are low in fat and missing essential vitamins like A, D, E, and K. All of these fat-soluble vitamins are imperative for oral health. Helping your body absorb calcium, Vitamin D, is especially important. According to your Burlington dentist, having a little bit of fat in your diet also improves your mood. Consequently, diets that are low in fat

Cosmetic dentistry dates back thousands of years with people brushing their teeth with sticks in 3000 B.C. The ancient Egyptians were far ahead of their time using gold for dental bridges and dental crowns. Although those oral hygiene habits may seem barbaric, they are much tamer when you consider that some people hammered seashells into their jawbone to replace missing teeth. The History of Cosmetic Dentistry Dr. Mike Morris from Chittenden Dental explains that although there is not much documentation regarding early cosmetic dentistry procedures, historians do know that ancient civilizations would use materials such as bone and ivory, human, and animal teeth for missing teeth. In 200 B.C., the Etruscans made dentures from bone and ivory. Another common material for missing teeth during that time was animal or human teeth that were extracted by live or dead donors. Obviously, the live donors were

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